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Growing up with vaccines

On-time vaccination throughout childhood is essential because it helps provide immunity before children are exposed to potentially life-threatening diseases. Vaccines are tested to ensure that they are safe and effective for children to receive at the recommended ages. For parents, the CDC recommends the following vaccines at these stages of a child’s life:

DURING PREGNANCY

Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine: At least a month before becoming pregnant.

Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) vaccine: During the third trimester of every pregnancy.

Yearly seasonal flu vaccine: By the end of October, if possible.

INFANT AND TODDLER YEARS, BIRTH TO AGE 2

Chickenpox (varicella) vaccine: At 12 through 15 months.

Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) vaccine: At 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and 15 through 18 months.

Flu vaccine: Every year by the end of October, if possible, starting at 6 months.

Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine: At 2 months, 4 months, 6 months (if needed; depends on brand), and 12 through 15 months.

Hepatitis A vaccine: At 12 through 23 months and a second dose 6 months following first dose.

Hepatitis B vaccine: Shortly after birth, at 1 through 2 months, and at 6 through 18 months.

Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine: At 12 through 15 months; however, infants 6 through 11 months old should have one dose of MMR vaccine before traveling abroad.

Pneumococcal (PCV13) vaccine: At 2 months, 4 months, 6 months, and 12 through 15 months.

Polio (IPV) vaccine: At 2 months, 4 months, and 6 through 18 months.

Rotavirus (RV) vaccine: At 2 months and 4 months (for Rotarix brand); or 2 months, 4 months, and 6 months (for RotaTeq brand).

PRESCHOOL AND ELEMENTARY SCHOOL YEARS: AGES 3 THROUGH 10

Chickenpox (varicella) vaccine: At 4 through 6 years.

Diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTaP) vaccine: At 4 through 6 years.

Flu vaccine: Every year by the end of October, if possible.

Measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine: At 4 through 6 years.

Polio (IPV) vaccine: At 4 through 6 years.

PRETEEN AND TEEN YEARS: AGES 11 THROUGH 18

Flu vaccine: Every year by the end of October, if possible.

Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine: At 11 through 12 years and a second dose 6-12 months following the first dose.

Meningococcal conjugate vaccine: At 11 through 12 years and at 16 years.

Serogroup B meningococcal vaccine: May be given at 16 through 23 years; if interested, talk to your child’s doctor.

Tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (Tdap) vaccine: At 11 through 12 years.

INTO ADULTHOOD

· Everyone should get a flu vaccine every year before the end of October, if possible.

· Adults need a Td vaccine every ten years.

· Healthy adults 50 years and older should get shingles vaccine.

· Adults 65 years or older need one dose of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine followed by one dose of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine.

· Adults younger than 65 years who have certain health conditions like heart disease, diabetes, cancer, or HIV should also get one or both of these vaccines.

· Adults may need other vaccines based on health conditions, job, lifestyle, or travel habits.

Source: CDC.gov

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